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Numismatic Photography Thread, I think that have decided on my camera / lens /etc -- in Miscellaneous Numismatic Information; Two more additions. The 1941 is difficult to image. It's a brilliant coin and that has been hard to capture. ...
  1. #51
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    Two more additions. The 1941 is difficult to image. It's a brilliant coin and that has been hard to capture. Looks much nicer in hand with blues and rose colors that I didn't really get the feel for. I will probably have another crack at it soon. Also, a now formatted 38-D that I shot a while back.




  2. #52
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    I have a few more coins imaged that I need to format. Which is painful. I've started to pay a lot of attention to the rotation of the coins to try to keep all of my images consistent (at least for jeffs -- I will need to do the same thing for other series). I am using the fold of skin under the eye and making this line vertical. I am also using the height of the "U" in pluribus to give myself borders of a consistent size. At the end I save the psd file and then do a save to JPG (with resize during this step) to get my final image.

    I need to figure out a way to speed this part of the process.

  3. #53
    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    I don't follow you. Rotate and size in post processing is cake. What do you mean borders and using the height of a letter on the coin??

  4. #54
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    Yes, rotating is not much of an issue now that I decided what feature of the coin on the obverse to use as a marker.

    What I meant by borders is really "padding". I want a consistent padding amount between the edges of the coin and the edge of the image. I also want a consistent amount of padding between obverse and reverse images in the final formatted image. Since I adjust the height of the camera to accommodate different sized coins and don't always get it at exactly the same height when switching, I decided to use a feature of the coin itself to get this padding size. For Jeffersons, I use the 2nd "U" in "Pluribus" That way, when the image is cropped and resized it is always the same as any other picture I have taken... regardless of how much space the subject coin took up on the cameras sensor.

    Also, I can't remember if I mentioned this already, but I solved my issue of making sure the camera was level with the platform of the stand by using a small mirror. Place it on the platform -- focus down (through the surface of the mirror) until you can see the lens. Put the lens in the middle. It takes about 30 seconds or so to get it perfect. Handy if you are taking the camera off the stand very often.

  5. #55
    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    Well that is one way to do it but it's kind of weird

    I'd just use photoshops tools to worry about all that, if you resize to pixels and not percentage it should fix the problem if I'm reading it right?

  6. #56
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    I don't think so.

    Consider the end result images that have the obverse shot on the left and the reverse on the right. What is a good way to ensure that there is a consistent padding between those two items across all of your images? I suppose that I could choose an arbitrary number of pixels and use that to measure. I just chose to use a feature on the coin and the rulers in PS to do the same thing. What tools in photoshop could make this easier for me? I am pretty terrible at using that software.

    At the end of the process I do resize to a particular pixel width before saving the results to a JPEG. The source PSD never has any resizing done. I might need that detail one day.

  7. #57
    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    You can just set up a template using guides, to use a guide make sure rulers are showing (Control-R), and then "drag" one of the rulers onto the image and it'll make a guide. It'll snap to those also (view->snap).

    So basically you have a template of where the coin should fit in, and where the borders are.

  8. #58
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    That's a good idea. I'll also include one guide for each side to use as a marker to consistently rotate the images to the correct size. That should save me quite a bit of time, overall. I'd been manually using the guides each time for my measurements and cropping.

  9. #59
    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mingot View Post
    That's a good idea. I'll also include one guide for each side to use as a marker to consistently rotate the images to the correct size. That should save me quite a bit of time, overall. I'd been manually using the guides each time for my measurements and cropping.
    Yeah best to use them... then just save it as a template. Make sure snap to guides is on

  10. #60
    Numismatic mingot's Avatar
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    Having a PSD to use as template is working out pretty good for me. I just formatted a new set of images and cycling through the results in picture viewer between two coins based on the same template is nice. Same rotation, size, etc. Now I need to go back and redo all of my old images to get them all consistent. And shoot some more coins.

 

 
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