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United States Paper Currency Thread, New One Hundred Dollar Bill Revealed in Currency Forums; The U.S. unveiled the new one hundred dollar bill today. Some of the changes are: Liberty Bell which changes color ...
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    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    New One Hundred Dollar Bill Revealed

    The U.S. unveiled the new one hundred dollar bill today.

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    Some of the changes are:

    Liberty Bell which changes color from copper to green when the note is tilted, a '3D' ribbon on the front, and a series of bells and digits. Supposedly this is '3d' if you tilt the bill, it comes into a 3d relief. I'm curious to see how that works.

    What do you think of the changes?

    I think counterfeiters are always able to reproduce the new bills, and rather quickly. Is it a waste of money (no pun intended), or do you think it helps?

    I feel there are other reasons these bills are changed out, too, due to drug cartels and other illegal operations.

    Who knows, but this bill isn't definitely not an enormous change on the basic layout. The new features however must be. We'll see in February of 2011!

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    Junior Numismatic raider34's Avatar
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    I was kind of expecting a bigger change, the design seems pretty much the same. I'll still be interested to see them in person, and see how the 3d works.

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    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raider34 View Post
    I was kind of expecting a bigger change, the design seems pretty much the same. I'll still be interested to see them in person, and see how the 3d works.
    Yeah I thought it was going to be something completely different. I am betting though that although it may not appear much different, the 3D work on it is probably a significant change. It is probably something that has to be seen in person to appreciate.

    Then again, you never know, may be nothing fancy at all.

    The blue strip is kind of weird... almost looks like it's a marked bill.

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    Junior Numismatic krispy's Avatar
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    I am very interested in seeing the new $100 in person when they eventually release them. The security strip down the face should be pretty dynamic, check out the video on newmoney.gov of how the effect works. Looking at these static jpeg images doesn't do it justice and a lot of people are dissing the new note because it looks ugly in a digital file. But there will also be the enhanced intaglio printing and the color shift ink 'bell in the ink well' in addition to previous security features. I wasn't surprised that the design didn't deviate from the other lower denominations but now that we have the $5-$100 notes revised, I suspect future $5-$50 notes will take on security features of the new $100 going forward. I'm pretty excited about the technological innovations. No longer are our notes expressions of aesthetic security design and enduring symbols of finance and liberty like classic currency but rather about layers of high tech tools in place to thwart fakes, taking over visual design and defending our liberty and finance capabilities.

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    Administrator Jesh's Avatar
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    True but most of the stuff has been there already.

    The biggest change visually is the huge strip and the bell.

    Let's be honest, a lot of people couldn't spot a fake because they don't LOOK for it. I've used $100's to buy everything from a pizza to buying suits. How often do these people actually look at the bill? If anything, the biggest give away of money is the touch - an experienced handler (e.g. cashiers, bank attendants, casino dealers) will know the difference in texture right away. Give it to the average guy working at a store, and chances are he won't know.

    It's great to have technology, but if you don't know how to utilize it, then it is useless. Take Google for example, I've seen so many people frustrated because they can't find the "right" page when it comes to more difficult searches because they don't know about simple things like using "and/or" or "+/-" in the search. Let alone grouping exact phrases.

    Don't get me wrong, I am excited about it, it's needed, but along with the list of things people don't do above: how many people have UV lights? Sure, it's great after the fact and you can trace it, but shouldn't all these deterrents be in place visibly, like the new changes are?

    And we all know the biggest reason these changes happen: drug cartels and expert counterfeiters.

    Pardon the rambling

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    Junior Numismatic krispy's Avatar
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    I agree, the security features are hard to understand and even visually detect for the average Joe at the till. I have seen people confusedly holding Series 2004 $10s up to the light and insisting they can tell it's a fake by touch, yet the note is clearly legit to me when I examine it. I usually don't tell a cashier I know about currency as they'd likely think me suspicious. In NYC I see a lot of cashiers in stores test $20s, $50s and $100s often with test pens. I think it's a bit more common here in the city to see big notes in use for everyday transactions and to question a note as fake, whether they know or not depending on a pen to tell them. None have the UV lamps either. I heard this attempted Times Sq. bomber bought the SUV with $1,300 in $100 notes and wondered if there has been a trace done on the notes to find out if they were fake. Haven't and probably won't hear about that detail if there's anything fake about them. And yes the drug cartels are the really big reason for changes. I'm glad you mentioned that because I don't see it come up in talk much. I don't mind your rambling one bit.

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    Junior Numismatic krispy's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    BEP, US Treasury Web Sites Hacked from CoinNewsNet.net [5/4/2010]

    Security researchers discovered that the website for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and associated "MoneyFactory Store" were hacked on Monday.

    The attacker added instructions to the front page of both sites that would run a script to allow a Ukrainian-based system insert instructions that will allow someone to attack a userís computer through the browser.


    Currently, the BEP website (moneyfactory.gov, bep.gov, and bep.treas.gov) and the BEPís online store (moneyfactorystore.gov) are off-line. The website used to support the launch the new $100 Federal Reserve Note (newmoney.gov) was not infected by this attack.

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    Numismatic tmoneyeagles's Avatar
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    Firstly, that is one ugly bill. As time goes on, our coins and paper just keep getting worse! :/
    And Krispy, that is some pretty scary stuff.
    Travis
    (Leader of the Kokapowa)

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    Junior Numismatic krispy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Yeah, to some it's aesthetically ugly. I'm over that argument though. The beauty of security engraving has been long gone for quite some time. The overall design of modern notes doesn't bother me, though the application of modern security features leaves us with a lot of visible clutter. I'm most impressed with the technological advancements that enable us to still securely use paper currency in our nation and I give praise for the sophisticated technological innovations that keep it so. It is the beauty of security technology embedded and wrapped around these modern notes that I admire. These notes may be some of the last our nation sees in physical circulation before currency is entirely removed for virtual/digital funding of transactions. To me when the notes go out of circulation it will be a bit like removing silver and gold from circulating coinage, the end of an era, in this case a en era that lasted from the inception of our nation all the way back to the colonial currencies. These modern notes retain every position of desirability to currency collectors and will one day take their rightful place in many collectors prized collections. In some future date there will be those who look back and admire those who saved examples of these notes and who assembled entire collections of US Notes. Certainly most all of us are drawn to the visually stunning craftsmanship and artistry of classic notes, but the same is said of coin designs of past eras when weighed against modern issues. Yet they are all collected and collectively form the basis of our hobby.

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    Numismatic tmoneyeagles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krispy View Post
    Yeah, to some it's aesthetically ugly. I'm over that argument though. The beauty of security engraving has been long gone for quite some time. The overall design of modern notes doesn't bother me, though the application of modern security features leaves us with a lot of visible clutter. I'm most impressed with the technological advancements that enable us to still securely use paper currency in our nation and I give praise for the sophisticated technological innovations that keep it so. It is the beauty of security technology embedded and wrapped around these modern notes that I admire. These notes may be some of the last our nation sees in physical circulation before currency is entirely removed for virtual/digital funding of transactions. To me when the notes go out of circulation it will be a bit like removing silver and gold from circulating coinage, the end of an era, in this case a en era that lasted from the inception of our nation all the way back to the colonial currencies. These modern notes retain every position of desirability to currency collectors and will one day take their rightful place in many collectors prized collections. In some future date there will be those who look back and admire those who saved examples of these notes and who assembled entire collections of US Notes. Certainly most all of us are drawn to the visually stunning craftsmanship and artistry of classic notes, but the same is said of coin designs of past eras when weighed against modern issues. Yet they are all collected and collectively form the basis of our hobby.
    Yes I agree, it is amazing that the security advances in technology make the paper 'beautiful' but we are lacking so much in the design of the bill itself, but I guess we can't put in too many demands, because we know the government won't listen to them anyway.
    I'm also glad that you see that soon everything will be done in digital transactions, a lot of people cannot seem to grasp that concept. I'm not saying I like it, but it will happen.
    Travis
    (Leader of the Kokapowa)

 

 
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